Water tank construction progress (22/5/14)

The water tank continues to rise.  At our weekly projects coordination group meeting today, I think it finally hit us that a) this new water tank is actually real, b) it will be completed soon, and c) when it is filled with water, we will have more water than Kijabe Hospital has ever had in storage in its history.  In one tank.

There was a fair amount of rejoicing at today’s meeting.

Now that the foundation is complete and covered with a layer of asphalt, the construction progress has been quite dramatic visually:  the steel floor plates were anchored, and Civicon commenced welding the one ton curved steel ‘shells’ together and then lifting them in place.  Here’s some pictures, and a video of the inside of the tank at the end.  Enjoy.

As you can see, the tank is visible from the main road that passes by the Hospital.  We are hoping to paint a large Hospital logo on the tank after the outside is painted white.

As you can see, the tank is visible from the main road that passes by the Hospital. We are hoping to paint a large Hospital logo on the tank after the outside is painted white.

Not a bad view

The minimum water level in the tank during operation will be around 2/3 full, in order to provide sufficient gravity pressure to the taps in the highest parts of the Hospital:  the new pediatrics wing and the men’s and women’s wards

All five 'shell' layers are now in place, with final welding underway.  The roof will be lifted on in the next few days, and welded in place.

All five ‘shell’ layers are now in place, with final welding underway. The roof will be lifted on in the next few days, and welded in place.

The tank roof is made of welded steel, and constructed in parallel with the tank walls.  When the walls are complete, the crane will lift the roof onto the top, where it will be welded into place...the roof weighs about 14 tons by itself.

The tank roof is made of welded steel, and constructed in parallel with the tank walls. When the walls are complete, the crane will lift the roof onto the top, where it will be welded into place…the roof weighs about 14 tons by itself.

From left, Kijabe Hospital's head plumber, Civicon's Project Engineer, QA Manager, and Foreman--leaning against the recently-welded tank roof.

From left, Kijabe Hospital’s head plumber, Civicon’s Project Engineer, QA Manager, and Foreman–leaning against the recently-welded tank roof.

This label plate shows the design standard that the tank was designed and built in accordance with, the American Petroleum Institute, or API, which is a common engineering standard for tanks and pipelines around the world

This label plate shows the design standard that the tank was designed and built in accordance with, the American Petroleum Institute, or API, which is a common engineering standard for tanks and pipelines around the world

The welders work at height, and in addition to the scaffolding are required to be harnessed via a safety line in case they slip and fall.

The welders work at height, and in addition to the scaffolding are required to be harnessed via a safety line in case they slip and fall.

Skyward, inside the tank

Skyward, inside the tank

Kijabe Water Tank Project: Inside of tank during construction from Andrew Steere on Vimeo.

Author: steeres

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2 Comments

  1. Thank you Steer for the great works. Your leadership has has made this possible. I look forward for Hospital having self sufficiency water flow from the tank. Mine is tro take care of enviroment especially the forest to have a great store there. c/m Kijabe S. Enviroment Group

  2. Thanks, John! It’s been a team effort, and in many ways we are just reaping the benefits of the leaders who laid a smooth path for us to follow. It’s a new season in Kijabe.

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